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Latest News 

Covid-19 Update
28-Oct-2020

After reaching a new high during the pandemic with 658 COVID-19 patients hospitalized through Monday, the Minnesota Department of Health's newest update shows that number has grown to 680 people with COVID-19 hospitalized through Tuesday. That includes 166 people with COVID-19 in intensive care and a further 514 patients hospitalized in a non-ICU bed, according to health department data. Overall, Minnesota's hospitals have a maximum of 1,891 ICU beds, and 1,074 of those are currently occupied (166 being patients with COVID-19). Just under 3,000 non-ICU beds remain available statewide (6,856 of 9,843 are occupied – that's 69.6% filled). Meanwhile, Minnesota's COVID-19 death toll increased by 19, reaching 2,387 since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. Of the 19 newly reported deaths Wednesday, there were two people aged in their 70s, 13 individuals in their 80s and four people in their 90s. Of the dead since the first fatal case was reported in March, 1,669 were residents of long-term care facilities, including 16 of the 19 included in Wednesday's update. There were 1,916 positive tests reported Wednesday, of which eight were removed for an official total of 1,908 confirmed cases. The MDH reported 17,230 diagnostic PCR tests and an additional 746 antigen tests for a total of 17,976 completed tests. Todd County currently has 872 confirmed cases of covid -19 along with two deaths.

 

Covid-19 Update
27-Oct-2020

Minnesota health officials on Tuesday reported 2,178 new COVID-19 cases and 15 more deaths. According to Minnesota Department of Health data, there have been 137,536 confirmed cases confirmed since March, with 122,100 of those patients no longer needing to be quarantined. More than 9,729 people have needed hospitalization since the pandemic began.The state’s death toll is now 2,368. Of those who have died, over half — 1,653 — have occurred in long-term care or assisted living facilities. Testing is now at 2,698,113 overall in the state. MDH reports that a total of 26,207 antigen tests have also been completed since the start of the pandemic. According to the state’s Dial Back Dashboard, the positivity rate is hovering around 7% as of Oct. 18. Another measure by which authorities are determining the state’s progress is the number of new cases per 100,000 residents. As of now, the Dial Back Dashboard reports that figure is at 27 per 100,000. Gov. Tim Walz and the state’s top health officials addressed Minnesota’s COVID-19 situation on Monday afternoon, urging residents to not be anything other than vigilant as the state’s virus statistics continue to soar. The governor called on Minnesotans to avoid large gatherings and to continue practicing social distancing. He added that the next couple of months will be crucial in the fight against the virus. Todd County is currently at 865 confirmed cases of covid-19 along with six deaths.

 

 

Golf Course Damage
27-Oct-2020

Nine kids could face charges after being accused of causing more than $40,000 worth of damages to a golf course in northwest Minnesota. Blueberry Pines Golf Course, located 8 miles south of Park Rapids in Wadena County, was significantly damaged on Oct. 18. The sheriff's office announced Tuesday that nine boys "who were responsible for the damages" have been identified and interviewed. "The full extent of the damage will not be known until spring," the sheriff's office announced, noting that the early estimate puts the cost for replacement and repairs at more than $40,000 A Facebook post from May indicates that Blueberry Pines debuted 60 new electric golf carts this year. The boys have not been identified, though they are from nearby Menagha, Buffalo and the Greenfield area. The boys are accused of driving six golf carts onto the course and damaged, in addition to causing damage to the golf course itself, including greens and bunkers. The case will be sent to the Wadena County Attorney's Office for formal charges. In January 2019, Blueberry Pines suffered a total loss of its golf club and restaurant in a fire, according to the Park Rapids Enterprise . A new clubhouse and restaurant opened earlier this year.

 

Upcoming Local Events & KEYL/KXDL Events

Goin Bow Hunting Giveaway

KEYL/KXDL along with Prairie Archery of Parkers Prairie and Long Prairie Fleet Supply bring you the Goin' Bow Hunting Giveaway! The lucky winner will receive a Hoyt Axius Blackout Bow valued at $999.00 from Prairie Archery in Parkers Prairie. In addition, that person will also receive..

 

 

Covid-19 information

Information from Centracare - Long Prairie

 

What is COVID-19?
COVID-19 is a viral respiratory illness caused by a coronavirus, which is a large family of viruses. Other coronavirus outbreaks include (SARS) in 2003 or MERS in 2012. COVID-19 is in the same family of viruses.
How does COVID-19 spread?
The virus that causes COVID-19 is spreading from person-to-person. Someone who is actively sick with COVID-19 can spread the illness to others through respiratory droplets produced when they cough or sneeze. A person can have COVID-19 before experiencing symptoms. People are thought to be most contagious when they are most symptomatic (the sickest) and some spread might be possible before people show symptoms.
What are the symptoms of COVID-19?
Patients with confirmed COVID-19 have had mild to severe respiratory illness with symptoms of:
• Fever
• Cough
• Shortness of breath
The CDC believes that symptoms of COVID-19 may appear two to 14 days after exposure.
What should I do if I think I have COVID-19?
If you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing, call your health care provider. For CentraCare, please call CentraCare Connect at 320-200-3200. DO NOT go to the ER or urgent care. Call first.
Who can be tested for COVID-19?
Symptoms are similar to other respiratory illnesses, such as influenza, so experiencing these symptoms alone does not necessarily mean you need to be tested for COVID-19. Additional criteria will help your health care provider decide if you should be tested, such as:
• If you have history of recent travel (within past 14 days) from an affected geographic area.
• If you had close contact with any person who is a lab-confirmed COVID-19 patient.
How can I protect myself from COVID-19?
• Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
• Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
Who is at higher risk for getting COVID-19?
• Older adults
• People who have serious chronic medical conditions such as heart disease, diabetes or lung disease

What To Do if You Are Sick

Call your doctor: If you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing, call your healthcare provider for medical advice.

Steps to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 if you are sick

Follow the steps below: If you are sick with COVID-19 or think you might have it, follow the steps below to help protect other people in your home and community.

man in bed
Stay home except to get medical care
  • Stay home: People who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to recover at home. Do not leave, except to get medical care. Do not visit public areas.
  • Stay in touch with your doctor. Call before you get medical care. Be sure to get care if you feel worse or you think it is an emergency.
  • Avoid public transportation: Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.
family separated
Separate yourself from other people in your home, this is known as home isolation
  • Stay away from others: As much as possible, you should stay in a specific “sick room” and away from other people in your home. Use a separate bathroom, if available.
  • Limit contact with pets & animals: You should restrict contact with pets and other animals, just like you would around other people.
    • Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, it is still recommended that people with the virus limit contact with animals until more information is known.
    • When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals while you are sick with COVID-19. If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wash your hands before and after you interact with them. See COVID-19 and Animals for more information.
on the phone with doctor
Call ahead before visiting your doctor
  • Call ahead: If you have a medical appointment, call your doctor’s office or emergency department, and tell them you have or may have COVID-19. This will help the office protect themselves and other patients.
man wearing a mask
Wear a facemask if you are sick
  • If you are sick: You should wear a facemask when you are around other people and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office.
  • If you are caring for others: If the person who is sick is not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then people who live in the home should stay in a different room. When caregivers enter the room of the sick person, they should wear a facemask. Visitors, other than caregivers, are not recommended.
woman covering their mouth when coughing
Cover your coughs and sneezes
  • Cover: Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.
  • Dispose: Throw used tissues in a lined trash can.
  • Wash hands: Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
washing hands
Clean your hands often
  • Wash hands: Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. This is especially important after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food.
  • Hand sanitizer: If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry.
  • Soap and water: Soap and water are the best option, especially if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Avoid touching: Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
don't share
Avoid sharing personal household items
  • Do not share: Do not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people in your home.
  • Wash thoroughly after use: After using these items, wash them thoroughly with soap and water or put in the dishwasher.
cleaning a counter
Clean all “high-touch” surfaces everyday

Clean high-touch surfaces in your isolation area (“sick room” and bathroom) every day; let a caregiver clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces in other areas of the home.

  • Clean and disinfect: Routinely clean high-touch surfaces in your “sick room” and bathroom. Let someone else clean and disinfect surfaces in common areas, but not your bedroom and bathroom.
    • If a caregiver or other person needs to clean and disinfect a sick person’s bedroom or bathroom, they should do so on an as-needed basis. The caregiver/other person should wear a mask and wait as long as possible after the sick person has used the bathroom.

High-touch surfaces include phones, remote controls, counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables.

  • Clean and disinfect areas that may have blood, stool, or body fluids on them.
  • Household cleaners and disinfectants: Clean the area or item with soap and water or another detergent if it is dirty. Then, use a household disinfectant.
    • Be sure to follow the instructions on the label to ensure safe and effective use of the product. Many products recommend keeping the surface wet for several minutes to ensure germs are killed. Many also recommend precautions such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product.
    • Most EPA-registered household disinfectants should be effective.
taking temperature
Monitor your symptoms
  • Seek medical attention, but call first: Seek medical care right away if your illness is worsening (for example, if you have difficulty breathing).
    • Call your doctor before going in: Before going to the doctor’s office or emergency room, call ahead and tell them your symptoms. They will tell you what to do.
  • Wear a facemask: If possible, put on a facemask before you enter the building. If you can’t put on a facemask, try to keep a safe distance from other people (at least 6 feet away). This will help protect the people in the office or waiting room.
  • Follow care instructions from your healthcare provider and local health department: Your local health authorities will give instructions on checking your symptoms and reporting information.

Call 911 if you have a medical emergency: If you have a medical emergency and need to call 911, notify the operator that you have or think you might have, COVID-19. If possible, put on a facemask before medical help arrives.

father playing with his son
How to discontinue home isolation
  • People with COVID-19 who have stayed home (home isolated) can stop home isolation under the following conditions:
    • If you will not have a test to determine if you are still contagious, you can leave home after these three things have happened:
      • You have had no fever for at least 72 hours (that is three full days of no fever without the use medicine that reduces fevers)
        AND
      • other symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough or shortness of breath have improved)
        AND
      • at least 7 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared
    • If you will be tested to determine if you are still contagious, you can leave home after these three things have happened:
      • You no longer have a fever (without the use medicine that reduces fevers)
        AND
      • other symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough or shortness of breath have improved)
        AND
        you received two negative tests in a row, 24 hours apart. Your doctor will follow CDC guidelines.

 

The KEYL/KXDL Radio Auction will not be on the air until further notice. This is due to our business office closed to the public. We thank you for your patience during this uncertain time.

Exciting News!!! You can now, not only hear Hometown Radio KEYL on AM 1400, but you can also listen to us on FM 103.1.

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